Volume 3, Issue 2, June 2018, Page: 61-68
Factors Affecting the Utilization of Sexually Transmitted Infections Health Services at the Primary Health Centers in El-Damazin locality at Blue Nile State, Sudan 2015-2016
Khalid Fadl Alla Khalid, HIV Prevention Program, United Nations Population Fund, Khartoum, Sudan
Samia Yousif Idris Habani, Free Lance Community Medicine Consultant, Khartoum, Sudan
Nada Jafar Osman, Directorate General of Primary Health Care, Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan
Malaz Elbashir Ahmed, HIV Prevention Program, United Nations Population Fund, Khartoum, Sudan
Received: May 21, 2018;       Accepted: Jun. 6, 2018;       Published: Jul. 12, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.wjph.20180302.15      View  601      Downloads  50
Abstract
Sexually transmitted Infections (STIs) constitute a public health problem, especially in developing countries and among poor people, women and adolescent. In Sudan, despite the endorsement of STIs health services in 2004, within the primary health care (PHC) service package, the uptake of STIs by those in need remains limited. This study aimed at exploring the factors affecting the utilization of STIs health services at the PHC in El-Damazin locality in Blue Nile State (BNS) in Sudan, 2015 -2016. The Specific objectives of this study were: Assessing the capacity of PHC and care providers, in El-Damazin locality in (BNS), in providing quality STIs health services. The study was descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional health facility based study. The study investigated eight PHC and ten care providers during the study period. The study findings indicated that while 62.5% of the investigated PHC centers provide the STIs health services behind closed door, yet 75% of the investigated PHC centers do not abide by the necessary confidentiality measures in maintaining the records of the patients, as well as lacking some medical equipment. All the investigated eight PHCs centers lack management protocol of the STIs. Female health care providers (CPs) are only 30%. While medical doctors represent 80% of the care providers, only 20% of them received training in STIs syndromic case management. Eighty percent of health CPs specified the lack of protocols and guidelines affects the quality of service to STIs patients. The study concluded that the lack of STIs management protocols and guidelines, lack of specific capacity in STIs syndromic case management, limited numbers of female care providers, insufficient medical equipment adversely affect the quality STIs services.
Keywords
Sexually Transmitted Infections, STIs Health Service Provision, STIs Syndromic Case Management, PHC Capacities, Care Providers’ Capacities, Confidentiality of STIs Service Provision, Quality of STIs Service Provision
To cite this article
Khalid Fadl Alla Khalid, Samia Yousif Idris Habani, Nada Jafar Osman, Malaz Elbashir Ahmed, Factors Affecting the Utilization of Sexually Transmitted Infections Health Services at the Primary Health Centers in El-Damazin locality at Blue Nile State, Sudan 2015-2016, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2018, pp. 61-68. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20180302.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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